Triptophonic

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aec.cdb5637316192.2
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    Triptophonic Absurd Machine Records
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Review

Review Text While it might be an auspicious idea to make one's debut effort a double album, Guerrilla Funk Monster is intent on bucking the odds, starting with a funk-meets-dub reggae mix in "Robot Dub Jam," a track resembling a cross between Inner Circle and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. "Nothing to Say" is more of a groovy number with a simplistic arrangement, but has a terrific flow and fluidity until its messy conclusion. Sharing the vocals and a potpourri of instruments, the group's collective attitude works well in places, but misses the mark in others. "Grimmus Gromley and Finnigus Minch" is a good idea, but the dichotomy between sounding too busy and too mellow is almost too extreme. "Ron Donson" is another song that has nu-metal and funk running through it, which seems like mixing oil and water. Another sticking point tends to be the brief but slightly annoying instrumentals that add nothing to the proceedings. "Ani Could Sing" has a soulful hue, and is stronger than most of the other tunes on the first disc as a result. "Poor Boy" continues along this path, especially by adding a healthy dose of organ. It also has a murky funk quality to it, resembling songs from the Dead Presidents soundtrack. "Drop the Load" evokes images of a young James Brown as Chris Maric and James Musulak share horn duties. The second disc follows the same pattern as the first disc, with songs like "How Long 'Til We Get There?" providing an earthier, organic feeling. Slightly more experimental yet subdued during "Alone," the band appears to have lost its energy and even enthusiasm. The album's nadir would have to be "Faces That Were Made," a somber and almost pointless tune. Fortunately, "Wake Today" has more urgency despite a formulaic bassline and Santana-like arrangement. "Savages," whose music was co-written by Nelly Furtado, has a larger cinematic sound, using an assortment of bells and whistles. Sounding like a cross between Bob Marley and Louis Armstrong, it's a memorable track. Unfortunately though, a portion sounds like filler. A more focused single album would have done the trick. ~ Jason MacNeil

Track Listing

CD: 1

  1. 1. Robot Dub Jam - 4:49
  2. 2. Nothing to Say - 3:13
  3. 3. Grimmus Gromely & Finnigus Minch - 5:39
  4. 4. Farmer Hair - 1:30
  5. 5. Foolish Man - 3:20
  6. 6. Burgundy - 1:20
  7. 7. Ani Could Sing - 4:50
  8. 8. Poor Boy - 5:04
  9. 9. Hold My Own - 6:01
  10. 10. Quatro en el Quarto Quarto - 1:52
  11. 11. Ron Donson - 5:46
  12. 12. Drop the Load - 7:05
  13. 13. Robot Love Serenade - 1:34
  14. 14. Organic Space - 4:08
  15. 15. Interlijeridoo - 0:29
  16. 16. How Long 'Til We Get There? - 4:26
  17. 17. I'm Gone - 3:43
  18. 18. Alone - 4:44
  19. 19. Break My Bones - 5:03
  20. 20. Faces That Were Made - 4:43
  21. 21. Lijepa - 4:17
  22. 22. Long 'Til We Get There - 1:31
  23. 23. Wake Today - 6:07
  24. 24. Tienes Miedo? - 1:30
  25. 25. What I'm Being Fed - 7:39
  26. 26. Puddlepants - 1:45
  27. 27. Savages - 5:58
  28. 28. Drunk Bot Rub Jam - 1:33

Product Details

Release Date
11/9/04 

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