Color of Pomegranates [Criterion Collection] [Blu-ray]

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aec.crrn2874br 4/17/18 New
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Synopsis

Director Sergei Paradjanov made a practice of making highly idiosyncratic films based on the folklore of regions in the former Soviet Union. In 1969 he made this film, based in part on the life of the 18th-century Armenian poet, Sayat Nova ('The King of Song'). Renowned for his writings and his religious lifestyle, Sayat Nova became a martyr when he grew too influential for the authorities to control. Seriously out of favor with Soviet governmental bureaucrats, this film was not seen in the international arena until 1977. Then, The Color of Pomegranates was widely acclaimed for its poetic and non-narrative blending of historical and biographical Armenian imagery. ~ Clarke Fountain, Rovi

Product Details

Release Date
4/17/18 
Studio
Criterion
MPAA Rating
NR -- Not rated
Length
1 hour, 18 minutes
Sound
  • No information available
Region
  • Blu-ray region A (North America, Central America, South America, Japan, Taiwan, North Korea, South Korea, Hong Kong, Southeast Asia)
Subtitles
  • English
Video Features
  • New 4K digital restoration, undertaken by The Film Foundation's World Cinema Project in collaboration with the Cineteca di Bologna, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack
  • New Audio Commentary featuring critic, filmmaker, and festival programmer Tony Rayns
  • The Color of Armenian Land, a rarely seen 1969 documentary by Mikhail Vartanov featuring footage of Director Sergei Parajanov at work
  • New video essay on the film's symbols and references, featuring scholar James Steffen
  • New interview with Steffen on the production of the film
  • Documentaries from 1977 and 2003 on Armenian poet Sayat-Nova and Parajanov
  • The Last Film, a 2015 experimental short documentary by Martiros M. Vartanov
  • New English subtitle translation
  • Plus: An essay by film scholar Ian Christie
Number of Discs
1

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